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Wendy van Eyck is married to Xylon, who talks non-stop about cycling, and makes her laugh. She writes for anyone who has ever held a loved one’s hand through illness, ever believed in God despite hard circumstances or ever left on a spontaneous 2-week holiday through a foreign land with just a backpack. You can follow Wendy’s story and subscribe to receive her free ebook, “Life, life and more life” at ilovedevotionals.com. She would also love to connect with you on Facebook and Twitter.

What the Tour De France teaches us about Jesus

Wendy van Eyck
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Wendy van Eyck is married to Xylon, who talks non-stop about cycling, and makes her laugh. She writes for anyone who has ever held a loved one’s hand through illness, ever believed in God despite hard circumstances or ever left on a spontaneous 2-week holiday through a foreign land with just a backpack. You can follow Wendy’s story and subscribe to receive her free ebook, “Life, life and more life” at ilovedevotionals.com. She would also love to connect with you on Facebook and Twitter.

#Jesus #sacrifice #sport

So if you're serious about living this new resurrection life with Christ, act like it. Pursue the things over which Christ presides. Don't shuffle along, eyes to the ground, absorbed with the things right in front of you. Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—that's where the action is. See things from his perspective. Colossians 3:1-2 (MSG)

Photo Credit: Wendy van Eyck

The Tour de France is a 3 week cycle race. This race is the Super Bowl of cycling; it is the race every single cyclist dreams of winning. 

Each year, it follows a different route; most of it through France, and the winner is the person who has the least accumulated time at the end of it. 

While cycling is an individual sport it is raced as a team. Out of the 9 riders on a team, one is the leader, and the other 8 riders will turn themselves inside out to help that person win. They will drag their leader up a hill, they will fetch and carry food and water for him and they’ll give up the chance to win, because their job is to be second and let the leader shine. 

Last year (2012) I was fascinated by a guy called Chris Froome who put his dreams of winning the tour aside so that his team leader, Bradley Wiggins coud win. I’ve been thinking of how their relationship was a picture of the one we should have with Jesus.

Froome was willing to take second place because his job is to pursue anything that will help Wiggin’s win. Froome gave everything he had to help Wiggin’s win because he realized that he is part of a team whose job it is to support their leader – no matter what the cost. 

Sometimes to our eyes this seems unfair. 

Froome gets that when Wiggin’s wins the whole team wins.

To step aside and let someone else be the center of attention is one of the hardest things to do. Even when we’re stepping aside so that others can see Jesus.

I don’t like being second but I’m trying to learn to be second, to be in the background, to let Jesus take all the glory.

I’m realizing that when Jesus wins, everyone wins. (<-- tweet this)

After reading this, how do you feel about coming in second? How do you need to adjust your focus so that God gets the glory for everything you do?

I’d love to hear your answers via a comment below or if you enjoyed this post why not tweet it or Subscribe to I Love Devotionals by Email. I’d also love for you to connect on my facebook and twitter pages

See the original devotional on my website here.

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