How to Help Your Kids Navigate a Friendship Break-Up

How to Help Your Kids Navigate a Friendship Break-Up

“Madison isn’t my friend anymore,” my daughter told me when I asked her why she wasn’t arranging to have a play date with her best friend from school.

“Why aren’t you friends anymore?”

“I don’t know. All of a sudden, she became weird around me and stopped talking to me. Then when I asked her about it, she said, “I don’t know what you are talking about.”

Being a tween in this day and age can be tough, and parenting them can be tough too, especially when you are raising Christian kids. In situations like the one above, it is hard to watch my child grieve over the loss of a good friend, but the fact that the friend doesn’t share the same values might be a blessing in disguise.

Do you have difficulty figuring out when your child should continue working on a friendship and when to help them let it go? Here are some tips on how to successfully love your kids through difficulties with their friends:

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1. Analyze the Word

One attribute that sets spiritually maturing kids apart from other kids is their ability to apply the word of God to their lives. Think about some of the verses in the Bible you think may apply here. For example, the Word tells them to be shining stars amongst a crooked generation (Philippians 2:15) and to be innocent as doves but shrewd as snakes (Matthew 10:16). This applies to making (and keeping) friendships. They are called to be a light and innocent with those they meet, but they must act with wisdom and discernment if the friend is asking them to do something they don’t want to do. 

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